USDA scientists discover how FMD virus begins infection in cattle

U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists have identified the primary site where the virus that causes foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) begins infection in cattle. This discovery could lead to development of new vaccines to control and potentially eradicate FMD, a highly contagious and sometimes fatal viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals that is considered the most economically devastating livestock disease in the world. Read more…

TAHC adopts revisions to Texas’ cattle trich program

The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) adopted revisions to Texas’ cattle trichomoniasis program during the quarterly Commission Meeting on Oct. 5. Bovine trichomoniasis, or trich, is a venereal disease found in cattle, but does not affect humans or other livestock. Infected breeding bulls continue to appear and act normal. Only testing by a veterinary practitioner will confirm the presence or absence of the disease. Read more…

Protect your herd from shipping fever

Calves with drooping head or ears, a cough and nasal discharge and refusal to eat or drink—these are just some of the signs to watch for as you wean calves and receive stocker cattle this fall. These symptoms and others could indicate that bovine respiratory disease (BRD), also referred to as shipping fever, has infected a single animal or your entire herd. BRD can be a costly proposition for cattle producers—not only from the perspective of the dollars spent on treatment, but also from its effect on the performance of cattle. The disease often results in lower average daily gains and reduced feed efficiency. Read more…

Producers urged to participate in updated National Johne’s Disease Control Program

Dairy and beef producers and bovine veterinarians are encouraged to check out the revised Uniform Program Standards for the Voluntary Bovine Johne’s Disease Control Program developed by USDA in conjunction with the U.S. Animal Health Association that went into effect Sept 1. The good news for producers and veterinarians is that the updated Control Program is less cumbersome, has three levels of producer involvement and has an easier-to-understand-and-follow system for classifying herds that have a lower risk of transmitting Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), the bacteria known to cause Johne’s disease. Read more…