US Drought Monitor for July 8, 2014

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A relatively narrow band of heavy rain was observed from near Lubbock to Wichita Falls in Texas, while a fairly concentrated area of heavy rain was reported from about Houston to Victoria in eastern Texas. About a dozen relatively minor revisions were made to the depiction in Texas this week, some degradations and some improvements. No changes were made in Oklahoma. Read more…

US Drought Monitor and Summary, July 1, 2014

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Texas had an unexpectedly wet week, with very heavy precipitation along the Gulf Coast and moderate to heavy precipitation in the interior East, supporting 1-category improvements. Relatively small alterations were made to the depiction in southern and far western Texas, both improvements and degradations.  In Oklahoma, widespread one-category improvements were made in the northern portion of the state, due to very heavy rains during the past 30-days. Read more at droughtmonitor.unl.edu…

US Drought Monitor and Summary, June 24, 2014

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Despite temperatures in the 90s, rainfall during the week was sufficient to warrant modest to significant reductions in drought from northern and central Oklahoma southward into Texas. Showers and thunderstorms dropped 2 to locally more than 4 inches of rain from the eastern Oklahoma panhandle southeastward into central Oklahoma and east-central Texas. Farther south, a slow-moving disturbance drifted north from northeastern Mexico along the Rio Grande River Valley, dropping moderate to excessive rainfall from Laredo to the western Edwards Plateau. Likewise, a separate area of showers and thunderstorms swept across Texas’ Trans-Pecos region later in the week. These two areas of rain resulted in notable decreases in drought intensity and coverage across southern and western Texas. Read more…

US Drought Monitor and Summary, June 17, 2014

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Despite temperatures in the 90s, rainfall during the week was sufficient to warrant some modest reductions in drought from northern and central Oklahoma southward into central Texas, while hot, mostly dry conditions in western and northeastern portions of Texas led to small increases in drought intensity. Showers and thunderstorms dropped 1 to locally more than 2 inches of rain across much of central and northeastern Oklahoma, which – while not nearly enough to warrant widespread drought reduction or removal – were enough to improve pastures and summer crop prospects. In Texas, similar amounts of rainfall were reported from Lubbock southeast toward Waco and southward into Austin and San Antonio. Consequently, reductions in drought intensity were made in areas where the heaviest rain fell, although long-term Read more…

US Drought Monitor and Summary for June 10, 2014

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Beneficial rains (0.9 – 2.7 inches) fell across much the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. The rains prompted the contraction of D4 (exceptional drought) across northern Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle, while D3 (extreme drought) was trimmed from the Oklahoma panhandle and southeastern Colorado. Subsoil conditions across Oklahoma and Texas are still quite dry with 71 and 59 percent of the reports indicating Very Short or Short of Moisture conditions, respectively. Read more…

US Drought Monitor and Summary, June 3, 2014

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There were some new assessment tools available for Texas this week, and based on a substantial amount of added information, almost the entire state was redrawn, though Drought Monitor change was limited to 1 category in most of the state. Exceptions included some of the wet areas in the east, and a re-evaluated area in west-central Texas which has received significantly more relief than has been previously indicated. Read more…

National Drought Summary for May 27, 2014

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Texas experienced widespread improvements in Exceptional (D4), Extreme (D3), and Severe (D2) Drought largely throughout the central part of the state and the Panhandle. Moderate Drought (D1) and Abnormal Dryness (D0) also decreased, mainly in the eastern part of the state. Oklahoma likewise experienced an improvement mostly in Exceptional (D4) and Extreme (D3) Drought throughout the center of the state. Read more…

National drought summary for May 20, 2014

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Locally heavy rain came to the South early in the Drought Monitor week. Areas of Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas benefitted. Areas of Abnormal Dryness (D0) were removed from southern and eastern Texas. Mounting deficits saw degradation of drought conditions in western and central Texas. Areas of Exceptional Drought (D4) expanded in central Texas where lake and stream levels are exceptionally low, water supplies are dwindling, and water restrictions are the norm. With some places going months without appreciable precipitation, degradation was in line in most locations in Oklahoma, with the exception of the extreme southeast part of the state. Areas of Exceptional (D4), Extreme (D3), Severe (D2), and Moderate Drought (D1) and Abnormal Dryness (D0) expanded eastward this week in Oklahoma. Read more at Read more…

US Drought Monitor, May 16, 2014

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Oklahoma also felt those hotter temperatures along with some below-freezing readings late in the period, leading to more damage to the winter wheat crop, which has felt the brunt of a cold winter and coinciding drought. However, heavy rains did fall across the southeast corner of the state, bringing some 1-category improvement there. In Texas, scattered totals of 2 to 4 inches fell across northeastern and eastern counties this past week, leading to some relative improvement with a push west and south of D0-D3 in these areas. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, May 9, 2014

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After seeing some spotty wet stuff last week, virtually the entire region went bone dry, and triple-digit heat was returning to parts of western Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle regions as of early this week. This is not the recipe for recovery as the calendar pushes toward summer. What winter wheat wasn’t damaged or killed off by recent hard freezes was left to bear the brunt of the heat and dryness this week, with little in the way of relief on the horizon. Read more at droughtmonitor.unl.edu

US Drought Monitor for April 29, 2014

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All of the drought categories expanded across parts of Texas, resulting in D4 covering virtually all of the Texas panhandle, and D3-D4 expanded in northern Oklahoma. 1+ inches of rain resulted in the shrinkage of D0 in eastern Oklahoma, while similar rainfall amounts in southwest Oklahoma had virtually no effect on alleviating long-term deficits. April 27 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports indicated that 78 percent of Texas and 72 percent of Oklahoma topsoil was short or very short of moisture. Read more at droughtmonitor.unl.edu…

US Drought Monitor, April 1, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu Moving westward in Texas, conditions continued to deteriorate as short- and long-term precipitation deficits and declining reservoir levels raised concern. According to Water Data for Texas, San Angelo Area reservoirs are currently 7.9 percent full while the Panhandle Planning Region reservoirs are currently 1.7 percent full. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, March 25, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu In Texas, the combination of short- and long-term precipitation deficits, low reservoir levels, and low soil moisture led to widespread deterioration of conditions across the western two-thirds of the state. Most notable on this week’s map was the expansion of areas of Extreme Drought (D3) and Exceptional Drought (D4) across the Panhandle and north-central Texas while areas of Severe Drought (D2) and Extreme Drought (D3) expanded across central and west-central Texas. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, March 18, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu Intensifying drought across the southern Plains and western Texas contrasted with localized drought relief in eastern portions of the region. A developing late winter storm generated widespread rain from northeastern Texas into eastern Oklahoma, with totals topping 2 to 3 inches in the wettest locations. Consequently, some drought reduction was noted, particularly where rain was heaviest. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, March 11, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu Moderate to heavy rains of 1 to 3 inches fell on much of southern and southeastern Texas last week, but most of the region was drier than normal again. Precipitation totals topped a half inch across roughly the southeastern one-third of Texas. Dryness and drought improved in portions of south and southeast Texas, but numerous areas elsewhere deteriorated. Read more…

US Drought Monitor for March 4, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu In Texas, there were a variety of changes to the drought depiction, both improvement and deterioration. Recent precipitation was heaviest across southern and eastern Texas, where there were widespread changes for the better. General, slight deterioration was noted—with a few exceptions—across northern and western Texas. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, Feb. 18, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu Mostly dry weather and a west to east warming trend occurred in the central and southern Plains, with precipitation (0.2-0.8 inches) limited to eastern Texas. With significant precipitation (0.5-1 inch liquid equivalent) falling the past 30 days across the central Plains, plus relatively low normal precipitation amounts for this time of year, no changes were made in the central Plains. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, Feb. 4, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu Though light to moderate precipitation (under 2.0 inches) fell over parts of western, far southern, eastern, and northern Texas, many areas received little to no precipitation during the past week (though a few locations in the ArkLaTex region received 2-3 inches of rain). The precipitation that did fall helped to alleviate some of the short-term dryness. However, reservoirs along the Colorado River, as a whole, are at their lowest level (as a percent of normal) for this time of year ever, as is true of total water storage across the state. These factors prompted a number of 1-category improvements and degradations to the Texas drought depiction. Read more…  

US Drought Monitor, Jan. 28, 2014

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Source: US Drought Monitor In Texas, much of the eastern Panhandle has received 25 percent or less of normal precipitation in the past 60-days, with some locales in the lowest 5 percent (AHPS). This sizable area of lowest quartile PNP’s extends into western Oklahoma. PNP’s within the second quartile (25-50 percent of normal) are widespread across much of Oklahoma and southeastern Texas. Read more…

US Drought Monitor, Jan. 21, 2014

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Source: droughtmonitor.unl.edu A few areas in southeastern Texas and the Texas Panhandle worsened to Abnormally Dry (D0) or Moderate Drought (D1) levels, which were on the cusp of classifications last week. Read more…