Senate passes farm bill

The Senate on Thursday approved a sweeping new farm billthat would cost nearly $1 trillion over the next 10 years, financing dozens of price support and crop insurance programs for farmers and food assistance for low-income families. The bill passed with overwhelming bipartisan support,64 to 35. It now goes to the House where it faces a much tougher road because conservative lawmakers want to make deeper cuts in the food stamp program, which serves about 45 million Americans. Read more…

New Mexico reports more cases of vesicular stomatitis

To date, 11 New Mexico premises are under quarantine after vesicular stomatitis (VS) was detected last month in 2 Otero County horses. The counties of Otero, Valencia, Socorro and San Miguel have confirmed positive cases of VS, while Dona Ana and Roosevelt counties have suspect cases. The counties of Bernalillo and Santa Fe are considered high risk for cases of VS. Based on these findings, New Mexico’s state veterinarian says a health certificate (CVI) will be required for all New Mexico-origin livestock in locations where out-of-state livestock are a part of a public event such as roping, racing, breeding or other forms of public exhibition, or traveling interstate. The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) prohibits entry of animals from VS-quarantined premises into Texas and requires other livestock to be accompanied by a valid certificate of veterinary inspection. Read more…

Consumer Reports’ poll says Americans want antibiotic-free meat

A majority of Americans want antibiotic-free meat, according to a national poll released by Consumer Reports. According to the Consumer Reports poll, 86 percent of consumers polled said that meat raised without antibiotics should be available in their local market. Read more…

Will the European debt crisis affect Texas?

In the latest issue of Fiscal Notes, a review of the Texas economy from the office of Texas Comptroller Susan Combs, economic experts discuss how the European crisis developed and what effects it may have on the Texas economy. Read more…

Producers encouraged to scout, treat fields for grasshoppers

Summer’s here and agricultural producers in the Southern Great Plains should expect grasshoppers insect to play their usual rogue role. Without a cold winter or cool spring, much of the grasshopper population has lived through the early stages of its life cycle. Agricultural experts at The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation say pastures and fields are likely to be bustling with young grasshoppers that are ready to do damage. Read more…

It’s what’s for dinner: Philly cheese meatball sandwiches

A slight twist on an old standby. Read more…